Sunday, January 10, 2010

The Problems with Pronouns

Really, I can't find the answer for this question anywhere: is it, accepted to Journal X? accepted in Journal X? accepted for Journal X? accepted for publication in Journal X? Forthcoming with Journal X?

I tried getting around the whole problem by listing it as "Sunday, Sunday, Sunday! Bill Graham Presents" and also as "Live Live! Nude Nudes!"*, while having it flash seven different neon colors, but it doesn't seem to fit in with the overall tenor of my CV.

So, how do you list an acceptance on your vita?






* And no, I don't have the money to take out a billboard with the announcement. But I totally would. I'm thinkin' that 2010 will finally be my year --- maybe because it's the year of the tiger. Forget little black cats, this year is all about Tigeral Studies.

25 comments:

Bardiac said...

Congrats!!! Go you!

I'd put "Article title" forthcoming in _Journal_, I think. Or accepted for publication by Jounal X.

Congrats again :)

Tree of Knowledge said...

I second Bardiac, but I vaguely remember reading something about that in the MLA handbook too. and congrats!

annieem said...

I usually give the citation, then before the date I write Forthcoming 2010.

And tho I've been doing that since, well, forever, I have no idea if it's MLA-approved or not!

Congratulations, Sis!

pocha said...

Congrats!!! This is wonderful news. Go Sis :-)

Horace said...

First, Yay! Nice timing, eh?

Second, I've seen both Bardiac's format and AnnieEm's, and never batted an eyelash at either.

And third, did I mention, Yay!

squadratomagico said...

Congrats, YAYYY!

And: I think "forthcoming" is supposed to be reserved for articles that have been scheduled -- when you know the month or quarter it will appear. Otherwise, "Accepted by X journal," or "Accepted for publication in X Journal."

Feminist Avatar said...

I do what annieem does. I also like to put a year so (forthcoming 2010). In my limited experience, they usually give a hint of the year when they accept.

Psycgirl said...

Congrats! In psyc we use "in press" so I can't help you out on this one, sorry :(

Thoroughly Educated said...

Prepositions, no? And I'd have suggested what Squadrato recommends.

heu mihi said...

Congratulations! Wooo!

Tenure or Bust said...

As Thoroughly Educated asked, aren't those prepositions?

Sisyphus said...

prepositions, schmepositions ---- shouldn't I have been prepping for class instead of drinking some celebratory wine?

Ink said...

I do what Annie does. The instant it's accepted, I update the vita* to say "Forthcoming" after an MLA citation.

*Isn't it formally curriculum vitae, with the "ae" the Latin ending for "of" so curriculum of life/work? And abbreviated as CV. So why do we all abbreviate "vita" when just using that part. Why not "vitae"? Or is that because we're using it as a different part of speech. Or are we? Arrrrgh! Latin feels like math to me...

It's ok. You can point at me and laugh.

Bavardess said...

Yay for the acceptance! The wine was definitely in order. I'd go with either 'forthcoming in' or forthcoming 2010'.

Maude Lebowski said...

Yippee!!

Flavia said...

Hooray! This is the year of Sisyphus, indeed.

Susan said...

Yay! That's great news! Wine was definitely called for!

Prof. Koshary said...

Thoughts, in order:

1. Congratulations, Sisyphus! How wonderful to have such questions!

2. I strongly encourage you to revamp your CV so that the overarching tenor really is "LIVE NUDES!!!" in flashing neon colors. That falsely modest Times New Roman is so overdone.

3. I love, love, love your post on the Lady and the Tiger, for many reasons. I know exactly what you mean, most of all about the lack of clarity (or even advice!) from advisors. I adore the disciplinary signifiers. I also recall reading that actual short story with some sentiment when I was a little boy. Finally, I can't stop smiling in empathetic recognition of the sense that one must be a fierce, deadly tiger that will gladly wear a gown and little pointy hat, if that's what it takes.

Sisyphus said...

Oh, I don't know that I've mastered fierce *or* deadly. I've got a handle on stripey, and that's about it. Depending on what day it is I prefer to be ladylike and wear the pointy princess hat.

Sisyphus said...

PS, are you people *sure* you can put "forthcoming" without the word "accepted"? Something just looks wrong without the word accepted there.

hylonome said...

Absolutely, the article is forthcoming. When it's scheduled, you can add more specific information (like forthcoming Fall 2010).

Earnest English said...

Congrats Sis!

definitely accepted for publication in Supercool Journal. But I would also just do the MLA citation and then (Forthcoming.).

Definitely prepositions. "Busy prepositions always on the march." (Doesn't everyone get their info from Schoolhouse Rock?)

Sisyphus said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Dr. Virago said...

YAY!!!!!!! Congrats!!!!!!

And since forthcoming means, de facto, that it has been accepted, I think that's why most people default to that. But if it hasn't been scheduled for a specific issue, then you could write "accepted for publication," I suppose.

Hey, if you haven't yet written a thank-you to the committee chair from your campus visit, you could slip in a sly reference to this newly accepted publication, perhaps. Perhaps like this: Para. 1: Thank your for the opportunity to visit....blah blah blah. Para. 2: I also wanted to share with you my most recent good news: "Brilliant Article" has been accepted for publication in _Awesome Journal_, with a date to be announce, likely late in 2010.

Or would that be too icky?

Thoroughly Educated said...

Popping back in to say: Ink, yes, it is curriculum vitae, "course of life", but it is normally abbreviated vita, meaning "life" in the nominative. If you called it "vitae" for short, that would be like calling it your "of life", which would be weirder. The grammatically correct alternative would be to call it "curriculum" for short, but that presents other problems. In sum, knowing that the full form has the genitive of vita but the short form uses the nominative is a sure sign that you made good use of your liberal education. (Sis, it is appalling of me to be grammar noodge on a thread that should be congratulatory. Congratulations!)